Prescare’s Invitation to Welcome Refugee’s and New Migrants

By - March 13, 2017

ex: http://www.presbyterian.org.nz/for-ministers/prescare/neighbours-day-2017 Neighbour’s Day falls on the weekend of 25-26 March 2017 and coincides with Lent. Prescare, the partnership between the Presbyterian Church and Presbyterian Support, is inviting parishes to give up a little and extend a welcoming hand to those new to our neighbourhoods and shores – refugees and new migrants. As congregations, and as …


ex: http://www.presbyterian.org.nz/for-ministers/prescare/neighbours-day-2017

Neighbour’s Day falls on the weekend of 25-26 March 2017 and coincides with Lent.

Prescare, the partnership between the Presbyterian Church and Presbyterian Support, is inviting parishes to give up a little and extend a welcoming hand to those new to our neighbourhoods and shores – refugees and new migrants.

As congregations, and as individuals – and in the spirit of Lent – consider foregoing some Easter treats, and pool the money saved to reach out to refugees or new migrants in your area, perhaps by giving them a grocery voucher or gift card.

New migrants and refugees are often missing family and friends who are far away — perhaps left behind in a war-torn country — and are facing huge challenges adapting to a new culture and environment. I urge you to let them feel our love and hospitality with, if you can, a gift card that allows them to purchase what they are in need of.

“For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in…” Matthew 25:35

This Neighbours Day, join in and celebrate the rich texture and diversity of our neighbourhoods, through demonstrating welcome and God’s love for all those who call New Zealand home.

Read Moderator, the Rt Rev Richard Dawson’s, encouragement to reach out to refugees and migrants this Neighbour’s Day. View or download the Moderator’s Neighbours Day Message

 

Tips for engaging with people from other cultures
When communicating with someone whose cultural background is different from your own, misunderstandings and difficulty understanding each other are common. Use these simple tips for engaging effectively, and you’ll be in a better position to learn about the other person, and share some of your own culture with them.

Learn a little of their culture beforehand – Do some homework and find out cultural do’s and dont’s. Things that OK in New Zealand could be offensive to people from other cultures. For example giving the thumbs up “OK” sign is perfectly acceptable here in Aotearoa, but in the Middle East, the same gesture is used to convey disdain or contempt.

Learn a few language basics – Learning to say hello, please, thank you and other phrases may not seem like much, but is likely to be welcomed by the other person, so give it a go.

Expect differences – Be aware that differences exist, and be patient and tolerant toward understanding these differences. It is a good idea to keep a check on your reactions to customs and values that are different from your own to avoid causing offence. This diversity presents an opportunity to learn more about diffent customs, religions, values and perspectives, so be open to both sharing something of your own culture as well as learning something from theirs.

Be upfront about difficulties in communication – If you could not understand someone, or think that he or she did not understand you, say something about it in a polite manner. Speak clearly and slowly, if necessary, but do not shout as this will not make it any easier for the other person to understand, and is generally considered rude.

Err on the side of formality when you address people – Use appropriate forms of address – Mr, Mrs, Dr – to show respect, until you are advised otherwise.

Be sensitive with the language you use – For instance New Zealand’s Migrant Action Trust is now referring to “resettled communities” rather than refugees. Be aware of the difficulties settling into a new country and do your best to use language that supports people to feel included and at home.

These tips came from WikiHow to communicate well with people from other cultures. Check out this page for more practical tips.

 

 

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